Welcome to Jupiter, Florida!

Jupiter, Tequesta and Juno Beach are rich in history. The earliest known records date back to 1565 when the Spanish first came to this area finding the Jega Indians living along the banks of the Inlet and river. The Jupiter area first came to wide spread public attention when Jonathan Dickinson was shipwrecked on the shores of Jupiter. In the 1800's Jupiter's most identifiable landmark, the Jupiter Lighthouse was erected.

Rich in history this area has grown into a wonderful small community that encourages outdoor activities throughout its parks, sports activities, residential areas along the waterways, and the many miles of water that meander through the communities. Jupiter is famous for its beautiful beaches, the Loxahatchee River and the Intracoastal Waterway. The towns enjoy a vibrant cultural life as the home of the Florida History Center & Museum and several arts and entertainment festivals. Town and County parks provide recreational facilities for team sports, an aquatic center, and access ramps into the Intracoastal Waterway.

The towns offer a wide mixture of family residential neighborhoods, condominium and upscale waterfront communities that attract young families, professionals, retirees and seasonal residents.

Located at the northern end of Palm Beach County, we are 20 minutes from Palm Beach International Airport. Tri-rail commuter train service, as well as AmTrak service Palm Beach County. PalmTran, offers residents a comprehensive bus route throughout the county.

With its distinguished life style, the community foundations and infrastructure, Jupiter Tequesta Juno Beach and Palm Beach County are ideally suited to the business needs of today and the progressive requirements of tomorrow.

History

History Probably no other location on the East Coast of the United States enjoys the international reputation for guiding ships throughout the centuries as does the area now known as Jupiter. This location protrudes further out into the Atlantic Ocean, relatively speaking, than any other point along the coast.

Jupiter

Jupiter is rich in history and Florida lore with earliest known records of the Jupiter Inlet dating back to 1565.

How Jupiter Got Its Name

When the Spanish first came to this area they found the Jega Indians living along the banks of the Inlet and river. The Indians called themselves the Jobe, so the Spanish explorers named the river running into the Inlet the Jobe River, after the native tribe. Later, when English settlers found the area around 1763, Jobe sounded to them like the mythological god Jove, or Jupiter, and the name Jupiter has remained ever since.

Dickinson Founders

The Jupiter area first came to wide-spread public attention when Jonathan Dickinson - the namesake of Jonathan Dickinson State Park - was shipwrecked on the shores of Jupiter and narrowly escaped death at the hands of hostile native Indians. In his journal Dickinson chronicled his family's ordeal with the Jega Indians and his 230 mile trek to safety in St. Augustine. Today the Dubois Museum in Dubois Park stands atop the Indian mound described by Dickinson as the place where his family was held captive.

The Lighthouse Is Built

In the 1800's Jupiter's most identifiable landmark, the Jupiter Lighthouse was erected. The Lighthouse stands 105 feet tall atop a 46 ft. hill on the north shore of the Jupiter Inlet. The land that is now Lighthouse Park was once a part of Fort Jupiter, a military installation that was formed during the Seminole Indian Wars

 

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